Proceduri SAAB 9000

Discutii despre seria 9000 '85-'97

Proceduri SAAB 9000

Postby gergosaab » 28 Sep 2011, 21:57

Saab 9000 jacking and axle-stand points

Although most 9000 owners can find the points for the wheel-change jack, especially if they have the original owner's handbook, it is not so obvious where to place a hydraulic jack and once jacked up, where to place axle stands. The following information is gleaned both from the Haynes Saab 9000 workshop manual and from my own experience.
saabjack.gif

The front and rear jacking points are reinforced areas on their respective subframes. There is a locating lug on the front jacking point that provides a positive location for a hydraulic jack. However, on my car (1996 Aero) there is a similar-looking lug on the plastic cover just in front of the jacking point. Don't make an expensive mistake! If you look far enough under the car, the real jacking point is quite obvious. If you're in doubt, the real lug is made of metal.
The rear jacking point is under the rear towing eye. N.B. Never place a jack or axle stands under the rear axle. It is not designed to take the weight of the car, and will not do so without bending.
On the 9000 Aero, there is only a 5 or 6 inch clearance between the spoiler and the ground. My jack is 5 inches high when fully retracted, and I have trouble getting the jack under the front if the ground is not perfectly level. The Aero is the lowest of all 9000s as standard. You might have problems if you've lowered your suspension, though.
Here is how well (!) my jack fits under the front of my Aero:
jack1.jpg

jack2.jpg

If jacking up only one side at the front, the jack may be placed at one of the inner axle stand points on the subframe, towards the rear of the subframe. These points are circular and designed to accommodate a trolley-jack. On the rear, I usually place the jack under the end of the trailing arm that joins to the subframe.

Axle stands
Many 9000 owners will recognise four of the axle stand points as the jacking points for the wheel-change jack. Be careful to place the stands so that the weight is not resting on the tabs that the jack slides into, as these may distort and make it difficult to insert the wheel-change jack later. Place the stands a little further inboard. For the same reason, do not place a hydraulic jack under these points: some rainy night in the middle of nowhere, you'll be glad you didn't.
The other two axle stand points are under the front subframe, inboard of the wheel-change jacking points.
SAAB 9000 CC T16; 1986; 173 CP; Silver-Aero
SAAB 9-5 TiD 150 CP,2007 Jet Black
SAAB 9-5 TiD 150 CP, 2006 Chilli Red



SAAB, THE SWEDISH CAR WITH FLYING QUALITIES
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Re: Proceduri SAAB 9000

Postby gergosaab » 28 Sep 2011, 22:11

"Check engine" fault codes

Introduction
The Saab 9000 engine management system monitors the engine for faults and will illuminate the "Check engine" warning light ("Malfunction Indicator Lamp" or "MIL") on the instrument panel if a fault is found. This is primarily intended for emission-related faults but many of these faults can also cause poor running or reduced fuel economy.
The engine management ECU stores "fault codes" that may be extracted to diagnose the fault. To extract the precise fault code often requires special equipment but the Trionic and DI/APC systems provide a simple way for the lay person to determine which general part of the system is at fault. This procedure requires no tools or equipment.

Procedure (Trionic)

To obtain a fault code reading:

1. Turn the ignition switch to the Drive position without starting the engine.
flashcodes1.gif
flashcodes1.gif (11.01 KiB) Viewed 4632 times

2. In about six seconds the CHECK ENGINE light will go out for about 2 seconds. It will then begin flashing the first fault code.
3. The codes consist of a number of flashes, each having a duration of 0.4 seconds. The CHECK ENGINE light will go out for two seconds between each new series of flashing codes (if there is more than one fault).
4. After the last series of codes the lamp will go out for 3 seconds then it lights up again for another three seconds, following which the flashing codes will be repeated. The fault codes will be repeated in this way as many times as desired.
5. The flashing lamp codes will be repeated until the fault code memory is cleared. To clear the fault code memory, unplug the control module connector for at least five minutes.

Fault codes (Trionic)

Fault code Fault Corresponding ISAT codes
2 Manifold absolute pressure sensor P0105 P0106 P0107 P0108
3 Intake air temperature sensor P0110 P0112 P0113
4 Coolant temperature sensor P0115 P0117 P0118
5 Throttle position sensor P0120 P0121 P0122 P0123
6 Lambda (oxygen) sensor P0130
7 Fuel-air mixture P0170 P0171 P0172
8 EVAP valve (ELCD) P0443 P1443 P1444 P1445
9 Internal ECU fault P1651 P1652 (check ground, connectors)



Procedure (DI/APC)

To obtain a fault code reading:

Turn the ignition switch to the Drive position without starting the engine.
In about two seconds the CHECK ENGINE light will go out for about 2 seconds. It will then begin flashing the fault code.

Fault codes (DI/APC)

Fault code Fault
2 Internal memory check failed
3 Watchdog (control module fault).
May also be caused by a defective spark plug or ignition module.
4 Knock sensor
5 Engine load signal from LH or MAP sensor incorrect
Last edited by gergosaab on 28 Sep 2011, 22:27, edited 2 times in total.
SAAB 9000 CC T16; 1986; 173 CP; Silver-Aero
SAAB 9-5 TiD 150 CP,2007 Jet Black
SAAB 9-5 TiD 150 CP, 2006 Chilli Red



SAAB, THE SWEDISH CAR WITH FLYING QUALITIES
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gergosaab
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Re: Proceduri SAAB 9000

Postby gergosaab » 28 Sep 2011, 22:18

Replacing the Saab 9000 Air Filter

Introduction

The air filter traps dust particles to ensure a clean supply of air to the engine for use in the combustion process. These particles eventually start to clog the filter so it is designed to be discarded and renewed at regular intervals. This procedure shows how to renew the air filter on later Saab 9000s with a cylindrical filter. Earlier cars (up to around 1987) used a flat panel filter, located in roughly the same position in the vehicle.
Time required
Allow around 30 minutes for the first time. It should take less time with experience.
Tools required

Straight-edge screwdriver or 7mm socket

Procedure

1. Locate the air-box cover by the left-hand wing (as seen from the driver's seat), forward of the engine. Unclip the three securing clips (note that one clip is underneath).
airfilter1.jpg

2.For turbocharged models only, using a straight screwdriver or 7mm socket, loosen the clip securing the bypass valve to the inlet pipe. Disconnect the bypass valve from the inlet pipe to increase clearance.
airfilter2.jpg

3.Remove the air-box cover and push to one side.
4. Wriggle the air filter free and remove it.
airfilter3.jpg

5.Insert the new air filter into the airbox, closed end first. Wriggle it until it seats squarely.
6.Refit the cover and secure the three clips.
7. On turbocharged models, refit the bypass valve and tighten the hose clamp.



by gergosaab
SAAB 9000 CC T16; 1986; 173 CP; Silver-Aero
SAAB 9-5 TiD 150 CP,2007 Jet Black
SAAB 9-5 TiD 150 CP, 2006 Chilli Red



SAAB, THE SWEDISH CAR WITH FLYING QUALITIES
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gergosaab
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Re: Proceduri SAAB 9000

Postby gergosaab » 28 Sep 2011, 22:26

Replacing the Saab 9000 front brake pads and discs



Introduction

The Saab 9000 front brakes consist, on each side, of a ventilated brake disc (rotor) and a floating, single-piston caliper. The caliper is manufactured by Girling for Turbos up to 1987 and non-turbos up to 1989, and by ATE for later cars. This procedure lists step-by-step instructions on how to replace the front brake pads and, optionally, the discs. My car has ATE calipers front and back. I previously owned a 1987 9000 turbo that had Girling calipers on the front. The differences are minor, but please bear in mind that I might have forgotten some details of the Girling caliper. Changing the front pads on the 1987 9000 was the easiest pad change I have ever done on any car. I was impressed!
Time required

Naturally, this will vary with both the individual and what they find when they get there. However, this took about 20 minutes per side, including replacing the disc. Subtract perhaps 5 minutes if you aren't changing the disc.

As usual, double this for the first side if you haven't done it before. Of course, I was making notes and taking photographs as well.
Tools required

These are for replacing the pads only. For tools required to replace the discs as well, see here. I assume some basic tools, such as a jack, axle stands, socket set, etc. However I do not assume you will already have all the necessary metric socket and spanner sizes, especially if you are in the USA. Here is a list so you can make sure you have all the necessary sizes before you start.

7mm hexagon (Allen) bit to fit a socket set. An Allen key may not be enough to undo the screws as they may be quite tight.
Copper (anti-sieze) grease - My local parts shop keeps it on a shelf next to brake pads and shoes.

Procedure :twisted:
1.Jack up the front of the car and place it on axle stands. If you are not sure where you can safely place the jack and axle stands on a 9000, go here for more information.
2.Remove the roadwheel.
3. Move the pads free of the disc by levering or clamping the inboard brake pad to press the piston fully into the caliper, and by sliding the caliper outwards on its sliding pins. Watch the brake fluid level here, as it will rise when you press in the pistons. When I got to the second wheel, I noticed brake fluid dripping onto the subframe.
4.Remove the plastic plugs at the rear of the caliper and slacken off the two 7mm hexagon (Allen) screws underneath the plugs (pin seen from within wheel well).
caliper1.jpg

5.
caliper1a.jpg


6. If replacing the pads only and the caliper is Girling, remove the bottom screw only. Then swing the caliper up on the top pin to access the pads.
7. Otherwise, remove both screws. On the ATE caliper, unclip the retaining spring while supporting the caliper. Do not let the caliper hang from the brake hose, as this may damage the hose. The spring clip looks like this:
caliper2.jpg

8.Remove the pads. Girling pads simply slide out, as does the outboard ATE pad. The inboard ATE pad clips into the piston. Pull it directly out of the piston to remove.
9. If you wish to remove and replace the brake disc (rotor), this is the time to do it. Click here for the procedure.
10. Fit the new pads as a straightforward reversal of removal. My ATE pads came with a spring clip for the inboard pad and a self-adhesive pad on the outboard pad. If you have a self-adhesive pad backing, remove the backing paper before installation. If not, smear the backing plate of the outboard pad (and inboard pad for Girling calipers) with copper grease to help suppress any brake squeal.
11. Reposition the caliper and, for ATE calipers, refit the spring clip.
12. Smear the sliding pin(s) with copper grease and refit. Tighten them snugly.
13. Refit the plastic plugs.
14. Refit the roadwheel.
15. Lower the car.
16. Torque the roadwheel bolts to 120Nm (90lbft).
17. Press the brake pedal repeatedly to move the pads back onto the discs. If you don't do this, the brakes won't work the first time you use them (and there may never be a second time!)
18. Check the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir. Top it up to MAX if necessary.
19. The brakes will not perform well for the first hundred miles or so until the pads bed in. This seems to take longer if the discs are new as well. With new discs and pads, be especially careful for the first few miles. The performance of mine after doing all four wheels was pathetic for a few miles. I have since adopted the practice of doing the front discs and pads, driving for a few miles to get them working, then doing the rear pads and discs and going for another test drive. This is a bit safer and less harrowing
SAAB 9000 CC T16; 1986; 173 CP; Silver-Aero
SAAB 9-5 TiD 150 CP,2007 Jet Black
SAAB 9-5 TiD 150 CP, 2006 Chilli Red



SAAB, THE SWEDISH CAR WITH FLYING QUALITIES
User avatar
gergosaab
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